Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Look who's coming (again) YEC@GSA

I was browsing the abstracts submitted to GSA again this year and who should I come across, but more Young-Earth "research." If you browse the "Proceedings of the Creation Geology Conference" you'll see the same basic abstracts (with certain key dog whistles removed from the text). It appears that they have a coordinated source of funding: the "NCSF" otherwise known as the National Creation Science Foundation. Yup - this group got several hundred thousand dollars to "study" the coconino sandstone. This is part of a project they're calling "FAST," or Flood-Activated Sedimentology and Tectonics.

Links to the abstracts:
UNUSUAL BEDDING STYLES FOR THE COCONINO SANDSTONE (PERMIAN), ARIZONA

CAN COMPACTION ACCOUNT FOR LOWER-THAN-EXPECTED CROSS-BED DIPS IN THE COCONINO SANDSTONE (PERMIAN), ARIZONA?

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT MARINE SAND WAVES? A REVIEW OF THEIR OCCURRENCE, MORPHOLOGY AND STRUCTURE

These were all submitted by Whitmore and his students from Cedarville University. It makes me sad to think that these undergraduates are being fooled into thinking they're actually learning something about geology.

Then I searched around some more and found everybody's favorite GSA Young-Earther, Steve Austin, is presenting an abstract:

MEGAFLOODS ON THE SANTA CRUZ RIVER, SOUTHERN ARGENTINA

The second author, Jorge Strelin, didn't ring a bell - I've never come across his name on any Young-Earth papers that I've seen. Nor have I seen his work referenced by these folks. A quick google search led me to a variety of actual, peer-reviewed articles (which was confusing), but this sad little You Tube video then added some context. The video helped, since the clip shows Steve Austin talking about something or other. In particular, the comment thread that has since mutated around it makes things much more interesting. In particular, this quote from "lawilson200" helped clear much of my confusion:

I will let you know what Strelin has informed me. He has mapped out Paleolake Argentino, noting that it was 30 km (EW) and 25 km (NS) and about 75 m deep. He does not know how Austin derived his 5 x 10(6) m(3)/s(-1) calculation, but he concedes he is not certain how to determine flow rate. However, he does agree in general that the release of PLA was a megaflood. He does feel dubbed [sic?] by Austin, now that he has learned that Austin is with ICR, but it is too late to withdraw his name from the abstract to be submitted at GSA.


So, if lawilson200 is to be believed (I haven't yet verified the statement), Strelin was unaware of Austin's affiliations. And Austin is using Strelin's reputation to lend credence and importance to the abstract. This sounds familiar. And disappointing.

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